Cannedy 2016 Distinguished Tuskegee SVM Alumnus

Dr. Allen Cannedy joined a large cadre of EMC faculty this spring when he was awarded the 2016 Distinguished Alumni Service Award by his alma mater, Tuskegee University’s School of Veterinary Medicine.  The award, presented at the April Annual Awards Banquet held in Alabama, could not have gone to a more deserving individual.  Dr. Cannedy has long served as NCSU CVM’s director for diversity and has been the driving force behind developing a culture of respect and dignity and broad diversity at our College.   He is also a well established clinician providing primary care services for a wide variety of zoological species through his farm call practices.  His passion is camelids but his interests range from aquaculture to whatever animal needs his help.  His many clients and student mentees all would agree that he is an exceptional individual.

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Dr. Allen Cannedy -2016 Distinguished Alumnus of Tuskegee University School of Veterinary Medicine ready for a field call.

Dr. Cannedy has  contributed greatly to the many EMC students he has mentored over the years and continues to have a major impact on the lives of many alumni.  He is truly a distinguished faculty member and we are proud to have him as one of us in the EMC.

National Zoo and Aquarium Month

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Reilly the male lion at the NC Zoo with 2 cubs of his pride.

The United States celebrates National Zoo and Aquarium Month each June in honor of the important contributions of these institutions to our culture and the well being of wildlife.  The EMC celebrates the month emphasizing the role of veterinarians in the advancement of the abilities of our our zoos and aquariums to provide healthy and meaningful lives to the animals who are their responsibility.   Clinicians, researchers, and those working to improve the educational and conservation roles of zoos and aquariums are all contributing to the rapid evolution the many facilities dedicated to bringing the public close to the amazing animal life of our planet.

Over 175 million people visit US zoos and aquariums every year, including over 60 million children and student visitors.  Visiting zoos and aquariums is the largest recreational activity in the United States.  They are also a critical educational resource providing curricular materials for K-12 and higher education teachers, and supporting important experiences that can help inspire young minds to pursue careers in science and technology.

EMC alumni are helping provide for the well being of zoo and aquarium animals in states across the country, and we tip our hats to their dedicated efforts.  A recent blog featuring the annual physical examination of Reilly the 17 year old male lion at our NC Zoo provides great insight into the importance of our faculty and resident contributions to maintaining the health of the animals at the NC Zoo and is a very enjoyable read.

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First year resident Dr. Lori Westmoreland performs a careful examination of an anesthetized Reilly under the close supervision of EMC faculty member Dr. Jb Minter,(not shown) and the help of the NC Zoo medical staff.

Fish Genome Has Many Uses

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Dustin Wcisel (left) and Dr. Jeff Yoder (left)

EMC faculty member Jeff Yoder and his graduate student Dustin Wcisel played important roles in the recently published genome sequencing of the spotted gar, an important addition adding to our knowledge of fish genomics.  The compete genome of the spotted gar was published online by Nature Genetics this Monday (March 7, 2016) in a paper that is the collaboration of 61 co-authors and greatly expands our understanding of important questions about evolution as well as providing a very useful new tool for studying the function of genes in other species, including humans.

Dr. Yoder, an established expert in innate immune function related gene expression in fishes spearheaded the team of comparative immunologists who analyzed the immune genes encoded by the gar genome. The group included NCSU Functional Genomics graduate student, Dustin Wcisel, and experts at the Department of Pediatrics, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, St. Petersburg, Florida, US; the Department of Evolutionary Studies of Biosystems, SOKENDAI (Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Hayama, Japan, and the Molecular Genetics Program, Benaroya Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.

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Spotted Gar (photo by SONY DSC)

Gar are special fish in part because they are from a more ancient lineage that did not duplicate their genomes as has occurred in the evolution of most other fish species. Having the sequenced genome of the gar as a reference makes research comparisons to other fish genomes and even humans easier.  The lack of accumulated additional copies of genes in the gar genome also makes it potentially more reflective of an essential collection of genes.

The spotted gar is a powerful new model system for studying vertebrate genomics, evolution, and development because of its important phylogenetic position as a ray-finned fish outgroup as well as its accessibility for developmental studies.  Gars have enamel bearing teeth and ganoid scales making them a useful model for understanding vertebrate mineralization.  They also may have the ability to see UV light.  In the realm of immune function, Dr. Yoder’s team has found that for one class of immune receptors that recognize pathogens, some of the gar receptors are more similar to tetrapod (human) receptors while others are more similar to teleost receptors.

Loomis receives Order of Long Leafed Pine

Friday, January 29th, 2016 was a memorable day for many reasons.  Not the least of which, was that it marked the transition of Dr. Mike Loomis, long standing Chief Veterinarian for the North Carolina Zoo and Associate Professor (adjunct) in Zoological Medicine at NCSU to emeritus status with the North Carolina Zoological Society.  A celebration of his contributions to the NC Zoo, zoos and zoo animals around the world, and the discipline of zoological medicine organized by the veterinary health staff of the NC Zoo was fittingly attended by friends and colleagues from across the state (and further) who have enjoyed the opportunity to work with Mike Loomis throughout his career.

Many of the NC Zoo's veterinary health team, posing early during the celebration of Dr. Loomis' retirement as long standing Chief of Medicine for the Zoo

Many of the NC Zoo’s veterinary health team, posing early during the celebration of Dr. Loomis’ retirement as long standing Chief of Medicine for the Zoo

As the celebration, attended by 100’s of well wishers began, Mike released an owl that had been rehabilitated in the Schindler Rehabilitation Center, part of the NC Zoo’s veterinary complex.  The symbolism of Mike’s release to focus on his family and research and teaching interests was not lost on anyone.  Then, after some brief speeches attesting to his many contributions throughout his career, NC Representative Allen McNeil, on behalf of Governor McCrory, presented Mike with the prestigious Order of the Long Leaf Pine, one of the highest honors that the state can bestow on a citizen.  The honor was a complete surprise to Mike and he was fighting back tears as he accepted the award and thanked the many friends and colleagues that were there to share the moment.

Representative Allen McNeill presents the Order of the Long Leaf Pine to Dr Mike Loomis on behalf of NC Governor McCrory

Representative Allen McNeill presents the Order of the Long Leaf Pine to Dr Mike Loomis on behalf of NC Governor McCrory

Stories at the event abounded as slides commemorating many key events in Mike’s very productive career, including slides of all of the zoological medicine residents he has helped mentor over the years in the highly respected residency program he helped to found.  Many EMC colleagues were in attendance to help Mike celebrate his transition.  Dr. John Cullen, Professor of Pathology first knew Mike when he was a veterinary student and Dr. Cullen was a resident at U.C. Davis.  Dr. Michael Stoskopf and Dr. Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf helped recruit Mike back to NC from the San Diego Zoo so that he could join them as the triumverate that established the first 3 year residency in zoological medicine.  Dr. Greg Lewbart, long a key part of the residency program was there with his trusty camera making sure the festivities were well recorded.  Dr. Craig Harms traveled from his post in Morehead City at CMAST to be there and congratulate Mike.  Now a Professor of aquatic health at NCSU, Dr. Harms was the second resident and the first with an aquatic emphasis to train with Drs. Loomis, Stoskopf and Kennedy-Stoskopf in the new residency program.  Dr. JB Minter, senior veterinarian at the NC Zoo and Dr. Emily Christiansen represented recent graduates of the residency program that are now helping lead it into the future.

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Dean Terry Curtin, Zoo Director Bob Frye, Zoo Veterinarian Mike Loomis, and Head of the Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Stephen Crane pose with a patient at the NC Zoo hospital

Few people are aware that Mike Loomis helped to establish the long partnership between NCSU’s newly founded, then School of Veterinary Medicine, and the rapidly growing new North Carolina Zoo.  Through the vision of Founding Dean Terry Curtin and founding Zoo Director Bob Frye, Mike developed cooperative program with the Department of Companion Animal and Special Species founding head, Dr. Stephen Crane that has lasted over 30 years.  Mike left the NC Zoo to explore the opportunities the San Diego Zoo could offer before Dr. Michael Stoskopf was recruited to fill the vacancy created when Dr. Crane took a position with Hills Foods.   As the new Department Head at re-named College of Veterinary Medicine Dr. Stoskopf and his wife Dr. Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf, both diplomates of the American College of Zoological Medicine, looked for ways to create the critical mass of faculty needed to create a truly outstanding model residency for the discipline.  Luring Mike Loomis back to North Carolina was the lynch pin that set in motion one of the most respected zoological health programs in the world.

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Dr. Mike Loomis draws blood from an immobilized forest elephant in the field in Cameroon, Africa.

Everyone who knows Mike Loomis knows that he is just transitioning and not retiring.  Though certainly he will enjoy more time with his family including his much loved grand children, Mike intends to continue his important research on forest elephant movements in Cameroon and will be teaching veterinary students in selectives and other courses as part of his duties as Emeritus Chief Veterinarian for the NC Zoological Society.

 

Red Wolves May Help Understanding of Human Eye Disease

The red wolf reintroduction has generated knowledge that has facilitated many other predator conservation efforts through the publication of innovative techniques and basic science in the scientific literature.  Now it appears that the careful work with the red wolf may also help us better understand an array of eye diseases that may affect as many as 1.8 million people in the United States.

Dr. Freya Mowat, a board certified veterinary ophthalmologist and researcher who has recently joined the NCSU CVM faculty and the EMC is an expert on inherited diseases of the canid retina.  Dr. Brian Gilger, leader of the NCSU CVM ophthalmology service recognized immediately that Dr. Mowat was the obvious person for Dr. Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf to contact when students in the ZTAU Wild Carnivore Team reported that one of the wolves was showing signs of an eye problem.

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Dr. Mowat (left) examines the eyes of a red wolf restrained by Dr. Kennedy-Stoskopf (right)

A former large animal practitioner in England before taking on the challenge of PhD and residency training to study eye disease, Dr. Mowat did not hesitate joining in on the examination of the wolf on a cold and rainy day.  Her careful examination revealed the male wolf appeared to have a degenerative retinal condition that was first reported in the literature by former NCSU graduate student Dr. Anne Ballman (ne- Acton) in a review of red wolf pathology findings she published while a student at the University of Tennessee.   The condition has been mentioned briefly in 2 early red wolf recovery documents but work on the pathogenesis and genetic basis of the disease has been limited.  This is in part because the disease affects wolves later in their lives and has not been identified as affecting their productivity or success in the wild during their main reproductive years.

Dr. Mowat immediately recognized the potential value of better understandinig the red wolf condition as it relates to both diseases found in domestic dogs and those of humans.  She was quite eager to see additional wolves.  Which is how she found herself in sub-zero weather looking at the eyes of a dozen wolves being held at Alligator River just before the start of the semester.

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Wolf Biologist Becky Harrison (left) restrains a young red wolf while Dr. Kennedy-Stoskopf instructs Wild Carnivore Team students Haley Gunter (second from right) and Paige Harrelson (right) in the finer points of wolf phlebotomy.

Dr. Kennedy-Stoskopf and a team of 6 of the top students in the Wild Carnivore team were headed to Sandy Ridge in North Eastern North Carolina to conduct the annual physical examinations of the wolves in captivity both there and in Columbia, NC.  Dr. Mowat packed a portable ophthalmological examination kit that could work without electrical power and joined the team on two cold and blustery days of physical examinations.  It was a great opportunity for the students to work with some of the most experienced wolf biologists in the world and learn their techniques for catching and restraining the animals.  The students, Katie Cassady, Haley Gunter, Paige Harrelson, Hannah Gardner Marvin and Doug Margarucci also learned a few things about working animals in sub-zero temperatures.

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Expert wolf biologists Mike Morse and Ryan Nordsven show veterinary student Douglas Margarucci (center back) the finer points of hand restraint of an awake red wolf.  Hank the red wolf’s (center front) eyes have already been dilated for Dr. Mowatt’s examination.

Unbeknowst to the NCSU team, 2 of the wolves to be examined were the parents of the wolf Dr. Mowat had looked at earlier in December.  He was one of the pups in the famous pair’s only litter.  Known as Betty and Hank, the rather advanced age parents have lived near the visitor center in Columbia for many years and are well known to local residents and featured in many red wolf photos.  As it turned out, Hank, the father of the NCSU wolf has been having visual challenges of late and Dr. Mowat was able to document his retinal dysplasia.  Blood samples from all 12 wolves examined along with samples from the 7 wolves managed by the Wild Carnivore Team will put Dr. Mowat on an excellent track to better understand the genetics and the pathogenesis of the red wolf condition as a step towards evaluating the usefulness of an endangered species model of an important group of human diseases of the eye.

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Veterinary students Liz Hyde (left) and Katie Cassady (right) conduct a physical examination on an anesthetized young red wolf at Sandy Ridge.

 

Barkalow Lecture Wednesday

Peter Kareiva, Director of the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at UCLA will present to Barkalow Lecture this coming Wednesday, November 4, 2015 at 4:45 in 124 Dabney Hall.  The title of his talk will be Re-imagining conservation for a prosperous and sustainable planet in 2050.

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Peter Kareiva, UCLA

Peter Kareiva is the Director of the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at UCLA.  Prior to coming to UCLA he served 20 years as professor of zoology at University of Washington.  Before his academic career, he was Chief Scientist at The Nature Conservancy then, Director of the Division of Conservation Biology at NOAA’s fisheries lab in Seattle.  Peter began his career as a mathematical biologist who also did fieldwork focused on ecological theory.  He developed an interest in agriculture, biotechnology, risk assessment, and conservation and now mixes policy and social science with natural science.

The Frederick and Joan Barkalow Distinguished Conservationist Lecture was created to honor Dr. Fred Barkalow’s 37 years of dedicated public service to conservation of natural resources in NC and the nation. To recognize his career achievements, Fred was presented with US Department of Interior Public Service Award, and was the first inductee into the NC Conservation Hall Of Fame. As a founder of NCSU’s wildlife program, zoology department head, dedicated teacher, in field and classroom, Fred enthusiastically promoted wildlife conservation and mentored generations of students at State. Fred & Joan Barkalow’s living legacy to students & the conservation community is this lecture series, intended to attract the world’s leading scientists/wildlife biologists & conservationists to the NC State Campus in order provide students with informed exposure to science and policy challenges.

Congratulations to New ACZM Diplomates

Congratulations to Dr. J.B. Minter,  Senior Veterinarian at the NC Zoo and Dr. Emily Christiansen, Veterinarian for the NC Aquariums for successfully completing the grueling two days of examinations which are the final step in becoming certified as a diplomate of the American College of Zoological Medicine.  Established in 1983, the American College of Zoological Medicine (ACZM) is an international specialty organization recognized by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) for certification of veterinarians with special expertise in zoological medicine.  The American College of Zoological Medicine is dedicated to excellence in furthering the health and well being of captive and free-ranging wild animals.

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Dr. J.B. Minter, newly certified ACZM diplomate, conducts a health exam of an anesthetized lioness.

The Environmental Medicine Consortium has one of the longest standing training programs for young veterinarians pursuing careers in zoological medicine and an enviable record in successful completion of the examinations by its alumni.   Dr. Minter received his DVM from NCSU CVM and after an internship returned to NCSU and the EMC for his residency trainiing in general zoo medicine.

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ACZM Diplomate, Dr. Emily Christiansen takes a blood sample form a sea turtle.

Dr. Christiansen received her DVM from Tufts University and after internship training entered the EMC’s zoological medicine residency focused on aquatic health.  The success of Drs. Minter and Christiansen in becoming the latests additions to the distinquished group of veterinarians that makes up the American College of Zoological Medicine greatly strengthens the Environmental Medicine Consortium’s residency training programs in addition to the programs at their home institutions, the NC Zoo and the NC Aquariums.

Two additional former EMC residents made important strides in their quest to become diplomates of the ACZM.   Dr. Tres Clarke,  Associate Veterinarian at the Audubon Nature Institute, and former aquatics focused resident at NCSU successfully competed the first day of examinations and will have the opportunity to tackle the formidable second day examination next fall.   Dr. Jenessa Gjeltema, the most recent resident to complete her program in general zoo medicine at NCSU, and a clinical faculty member at UC. Davis, successfully completed 3 of the 5 first day examinations and will be looking to complete day one and day two examinations next fall as well.

Everyone in the EMC recognizes the immense challenge posed by the ACZM board examinations and are proud of the efforts of everyone from the NCSU program taking board examinations this year.

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Dr. Tres Clarke examines a sea turtle.

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Dr. Jenessa Gjeltema examines a lobster.

 

NCSU CVM Research Forum Success

EMC students and house officers were well in evidence at the 2015 CVM Research Forum held this past Friday, September 18th, 2015.  The key note speaker for the largest research forum in recent history was Dr. Robin Warren, Nobel Laureate for his work on the importance of Helicobacter in gastrointestinal disease.  His talk to an overflow audience was well received by the DVM, Graduate Students, House Officers and Faculty able to attend. The day of science gave the opportunity for budding scientists at all stages of their career to gain experience presenting in a large forum.

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Dr. Jennifer Niemuth presents new techniques for sea turtle metabolomics (photo Mary Doerr)

Dr. Brianne Phillips, the senior resident in zoological medicine made the podium, when her presentation “POPULATION PHARMACOKINETICS OF ENROFLOXACIN AND ITS METABOLITE CIPROFLOXACIN IN THE GREEN SEA URCHIN (STRONGYLOCENTROTUS DROEBACHIENSIS) FOLLOWING INTRACOELOMIC AND IMMERSION ADMINISTRATION” won second place in the hotly contested oral presentation division which featured 45 scientific presentations.

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Dr. Brianne Phillips starts her presentation on sea urching pharmacokinetics (photo Mary Doerr)

Dr. Lori Westmoreland anchored the EMC presence in the largest poster session ever at the CVM Research Forum which boasted 49 research posters.

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Dr. Lori Westmoreland explains her poster to founding dean Terry Curtin (right) and Emeritus Clinical Pathology Professor Jerry Stevens (photo Mary Doerr)

 

EMC participants included

Presentations:

DVM Students

Jarred, JoAnna Jarred, speaking on “IDENTIFICATION OF TWO NOVEL MYCOPLASMA SPEICES IN AN EASTERN BOX TURTLE (TERRAPENE CAROLINA CAROLINA) AND YELLOW-BELLIED SLIDER (TRACHEMYS SCRIPTA SCRIPTA)”

Gerlach, Jamie Gerlach, speaking on “THE ROLE OF TRIM9 IN MACROPHAGE MIGRATION IN DEVELOPING ZEBRAFISH (DANIO RERIO) IN RESPONSE TO A BACTERIAL AGONIST”

Shaina Stewart speaking on “ASSESSMENT OF ZEBRAFISH AS XENOGRAPH MODELS OF CANINE CANCER”

Graduate Students

Stasia Bembenek-Bailey speaking on “1H-NMR METABOLOMICS OF HATCHLING LOGGERHEAD SEA TURTLE (CARETTA CARETTA) WHOLE BLOOD AND SKELETAL MUSCLE AFTER CRUDE OIL EXPOSURE”

Amanda Kortum speaking on “FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION OF ANTIBACTERIAL PEPTIDES EXPRESSED BY ZEBRAFISH”

Jennifer Niemuth speaking on “A NOVEL EXTRACTION METHOD FOR THE PREPARATION OF HEPARINIZED CHICKEN (GALLUS GALLUS DOMESTICUS) AND HORSE (EQUUS CABALLUS) WHOLE BLOOD FOR H-NMR METABOLOMICS USING DRABKIN’S REAGENT)”

House Officers

Cannizzo, Sarah Cannizzo speaking on “TENSILE FAILURE LOAD IN TWO MONOFILAMENT ABSORBABLE SUTURES: A COMPARISON OF THREE INCUBATION TEMPERATURES OVER TIME”

Brianne Phillips speaking on “POPULATION PHARMACOKINETICS OF ENROFLOXACIN AND ITS METABOLITE CIPROFLOXACIN IN THE GREEN SEA URCHIN (STRONGYLOCENTROTUS DROEBACHIENSIS) FOLLOWING INTRACOELOMIC AND IMMERSION ADMINISTRATION”

Morika Williams speaking on “ORAL TRANSMUCOSAL DETOMIDINE GEL IN NEW ZEALAND WHITE RABBITS (ORYCTOLAGUS CUNICULUS)”

Posters

DVM Students

Leland Garrett – PARTITIONING OF DRUGS AND CHEMICALS DURING TWO CHEESE MAKING PROCESSES

Jamie Gerlach – FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION OF ANTIBACTERIAL PEPTIDES EXPRESSED BY ZEBRAFISH

Margaret Hull – INDUCING METAMORPHOSIS IN THE BUDGETT’S FROG (LEPIDOBATRACHUS LAEVIS), A NEW AMPHIBIAN MODEL WITH CANNIBALISTIC TADPOLES

Adeline Noger – MICROSCOPIC AND MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION AND SPECIATION OF LUNGWORM INFECTIONS IN CATS IN NORTH CAROLINA

Graduate Students

Dustin Wcisel – FUNCTIONAL AND GENOMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF NOVEL IMMUNOGLOBULIN-LIKE TRANSCRIPTS IN ZEBRAFISH

Mandy Womble – PITX2C MEDIATES ASYMMETRICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE HEPATOBILIARY SYSTEM

House Officers

Lori Westmoreland –  NONTARGETED METABOLOMIC INVESTIGATION OF CAPTIVE HARD (ACROPORA SP.) AND SOFT (LOBOPHYTUM SP.) CORAL IN GOOD AND COMPROMISED WATER CONDITIONS USING 1H-NMR SPECTROSCOPY

 

Wolf Prowl Lives!

Wolf Prowl is a reality.  Constructed on time and underbudget, and it is …. well Fabulous!

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Wolf Prowl celebrates the wild carnivores that make their home on in the NCSU CVM ZTAU

The Wild Carnivore Team and their advisor Dr. Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf hosted an ice cream celebration for the entire class and faculty last Friday afternoon (July 31st) to bring a festive atmosphere to the “Final Review” of the class.   It was a time for students and faculty alike to take great pride in what their hard work has created.

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The wolves also get a great view of the Wolf Prowl. The back is as beautiful as the front.

The Wolf Prowl is an elegant structure viewed from any angle.  The three directional “back stairs” are prefect for the day to day function of the building, allowing access from the wolf pens, the future bobcat pens and the tool storage area.

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The skills of the landscape architecct were more than a match for some difficult challenges of the site. The access path to the tool storage area is a great example.

Everyone is in agreement, the professional touch of the Landscape Architecture students has elevated the presence of this project, helping make it not only the most complex and ambitious Design/Build Project ever attempted, but also making it the most complete.  The hard work of the Landscape Architecture Students, and the DVM students and Architecture students who devoted themselves to ensuring excellent water handling and great functional esthetics really paid off and will continue to do so for many years.  And everyone is raving about the sitting boulders.

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Student welded brackets and custom end caps are just some of the careful detail that went into Wolf Prowl

But it is the custom handwork and the dedication to recycled materials that has really made the building special.   The roof structure is recycled mill flooring, meticulously joined and placed and then hand rubbed creating a very distinctive and beautiful roof system.  Details like the handcrafted steel brackets (student made) and roof beam end caps (also student made) ensure a strong and long lasting structure that will serve the Wild Carnivore Facility for decades to come.   There are too many special features to list, like the student constructed functional windows.  The list goes on.

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The hand crafted main doors of Wolf Prowl

And there is no finer detail than the hand crafted door that leads into the large room of the facility.  Constructed from more of the recycled lumber of the roof structure, with very artful computer carved specially designed handles and using laser cutting in some of the recycled walnut used for the outside siding, the door is an elegant functional solution that adds beauty and identity to the Wolf Prowl.

New Faculty Member Joins Department of Clinical Sciences

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Tara Myers Harrison, DVM, MPH, Diplomate American College of Zoological Medicine

Dr. Tara Myers Harrison has joined the Zoological Health faculty at NCSU as the newest member of MSM (MultiSpecies Medicine) and EAMS (the Exotic Animal Medicine service) groups in the Department of Clinical Sciences at the College of Veterinary Medicine, NCSU.  Coming directly from an assistant professor position at the University of California at Davis, Dr. Harrison also brings her experience with northern species from over 10 years of teaching and clinical service at Michigan State University where she served on faculty in various roles and managed the health of the animals at the Potter Park Zoo.

 

 

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Dr. Tara Myers Harrison gives a wild black bear a quick physical examination

Dr. Harrison brings many talents to her new role at NCSU.  She earned her DVM from Michigan State University and holds a masters of preventive veterinary medicine earned at University of California, Davis where she worked onthe problem of infection of spotted hyenas with canine and feline viruses, working in the Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya.   She is dual boarded, having earned diplomate status in the American College of Zoological Medicine and in the American College of Veterinary Preventative Medicine.

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Dr. Harrison. the Veterinary Advisor for the Tenrec SSP, holds 4 small tenrec pups.

Dr. Harrison’s species range is broad.  Her publications range across the carnivora, but include papers on rhinoceros, gorilla and even tenrecs.   She serves as the veterinary advisor for the Tenrec SSP.   From rattlesankes to ostriches, she is happy to work on any species.  She has a very special interest in the application of oncological therapeutics and diagnostics in zoological species and hopes to pursue studies to improve the application of advanced techniques to those cases.

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Dr. Harrison examines the eyes of a falcon chick

Dr. Harrison’s 3 lively daughters and two able hounds  along with husband Scott accompanied her on a family expedition across the Southern route of the US this July to arrive in Raleigh, stopping briefly to take in the grandeur of the Grand Canyon.

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