NCSU CVM Research Forum Success

EMC students and house officers were well in evidence at the 2015 CVM Research Forum held this past Friday, September 18th, 2015.  The key note speaker for the largest research forum in recent history was Dr. Robin Warren, Nobel Laureate for his work on the importance of Helicobacter in gastrointestinal disease.  His talk to an overflow audience was well received by the DVM, Graduate Students, House Officers and Faculty able to attend. The day of science gave the opportunity for budding scientists at all stages of their career to gain experience presenting in a large forum.

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Dr. Jennifer Niemuth presents new techniques for sea turtle metabolomics (photo Mary Doerr)

Dr. Brianne Phillips, the senior resident in zoological medicine made the podium, when her presentation “POPULATION PHARMACOKINETICS OF ENROFLOXACIN AND ITS METABOLITE CIPROFLOXACIN IN THE GREEN SEA URCHIN (STRONGYLOCENTROTUS DROEBACHIENSIS) FOLLOWING INTRACOELOMIC AND IMMERSION ADMINISTRATION” won second place in the hotly contested oral presentation division which featured 45 scientific presentations.

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Dr. Brianne Phillips starts her presentation on sea urching pharmacokinetics (photo Mary Doerr)

Dr. Lori Westmoreland anchored the EMC presence in the largest poster session ever at the CVM Research Forum which boasted 49 research posters.

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Dr. Lori Westmoreland explains her poster to founding dean Terry Curtin (right) and Emeritus Clinical Pathology Professor Jerry Stevens (photo Mary Doerr)

 

EMC participants included

Presentations:

DVM Students

Jarred, JoAnna Jarred, speaking on “IDENTIFICATION OF TWO NOVEL MYCOPLASMA SPEICES IN AN EASTERN BOX TURTLE (TERRAPENE CAROLINA CAROLINA) AND YELLOW-BELLIED SLIDER (TRACHEMYS SCRIPTA SCRIPTA)”

Gerlach, Jamie Gerlach, speaking on “THE ROLE OF TRIM9 IN MACROPHAGE MIGRATION IN DEVELOPING ZEBRAFISH (DANIO RERIO) IN RESPONSE TO A BACTERIAL AGONIST”

Shaina Stewart speaking on “ASSESSMENT OF ZEBRAFISH AS XENOGRAPH MODELS OF CANINE CANCER”

Graduate Students

Stasia Bembenek-Bailey speaking on “1H-NMR METABOLOMICS OF HATCHLING LOGGERHEAD SEA TURTLE (CARETTA CARETTA) WHOLE BLOOD AND SKELETAL MUSCLE AFTER CRUDE OIL EXPOSURE”

Amanda Kortum speaking on “FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION OF ANTIBACTERIAL PEPTIDES EXPRESSED BY ZEBRAFISH”

Jennifer Niemuth speaking on “A NOVEL EXTRACTION METHOD FOR THE PREPARATION OF HEPARINIZED CHICKEN (GALLUS GALLUS DOMESTICUS) AND HORSE (EQUUS CABALLUS) WHOLE BLOOD FOR H-NMR METABOLOMICS USING DRABKIN’S REAGENT)”

House Officers

Cannizzo, Sarah Cannizzo speaking on “TENSILE FAILURE LOAD IN TWO MONOFILAMENT ABSORBABLE SUTURES: A COMPARISON OF THREE INCUBATION TEMPERATURES OVER TIME”

Brianne Phillips speaking on “POPULATION PHARMACOKINETICS OF ENROFLOXACIN AND ITS METABOLITE CIPROFLOXACIN IN THE GREEN SEA URCHIN (STRONGYLOCENTROTUS DROEBACHIENSIS) FOLLOWING INTRACOELOMIC AND IMMERSION ADMINISTRATION”

Morika Williams speaking on “ORAL TRANSMUCOSAL DETOMIDINE GEL IN NEW ZEALAND WHITE RABBITS (ORYCTOLAGUS CUNICULUS)”

Posters

DVM Students

Leland Garrett – PARTITIONING OF DRUGS AND CHEMICALS DURING TWO CHEESE MAKING PROCESSES

Jamie Gerlach – FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION OF ANTIBACTERIAL PEPTIDES EXPRESSED BY ZEBRAFISH

Margaret Hull – INDUCING METAMORPHOSIS IN THE BUDGETT’S FROG (LEPIDOBATRACHUS LAEVIS), A NEW AMPHIBIAN MODEL WITH CANNIBALISTIC TADPOLES

Adeline Noger – MICROSCOPIC AND MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION AND SPECIATION OF LUNGWORM INFECTIONS IN CATS IN NORTH CAROLINA

Graduate Students

Dustin Wcisel – FUNCTIONAL AND GENOMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF NOVEL IMMUNOGLOBULIN-LIKE TRANSCRIPTS IN ZEBRAFISH

Mandy Womble – PITX2C MEDIATES ASYMMETRICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE HEPATOBILIARY SYSTEM

House Officers

Lori Westmoreland –  NONTARGETED METABOLOMIC INVESTIGATION OF CAPTIVE HARD (ACROPORA SP.) AND SOFT (LOBOPHYTUM SP.) CORAL IN GOOD AND COMPROMISED WATER CONDITIONS USING 1H-NMR SPECTROSCOPY

 

Wolf Prowl Lives!

Wolf Prowl is a reality.  Constructed on time and underbudget, and it is …. well Fabulous!

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Wolf Prowl celebrates the wild carnivores that make their home on in the NCSU CVM ZTAU

The Wild Carnivore Team and their advisor Dr. Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf hosted an ice cream celebration for the entire class and faculty last Friday afternoon (July 31st) to bring a festive atmosphere to the “Final Review” of the class.   It was a time for students and faculty alike to take great pride in what their hard work has created.

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The wolves also get a great view of the Wolf Prowl. The back is as beautiful as the front.

The Wolf Prowl is an elegant structure viewed from any angle.  The three directional “back stairs” are prefect for the day to day function of the building, allowing access from the wolf pens, the future bobcat pens and the tool storage area.

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The skills of the landscape architecct were more than a match for some difficult challenges of the site. The access path to the tool storage area is a great example.

Everyone is in agreement, the professional touch of the Landscape Architecture students has elevated the presence of this project, helping make it not only the most complex and ambitious Design/Build Project ever attempted, but also making it the most complete.  The hard work of the Landscape Architecture Students, and the DVM students and Architecture students who devoted themselves to ensuring excellent water handling and great functional esthetics really paid off and will continue to do so for many years.  And everyone is raving about the sitting boulders.

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Student welded brackets and custom end caps are just some of the careful detail that went into Wolf Prowl

But it is the custom handwork and the dedication to recycled materials that has really made the building special.   The roof structure is recycled mill flooring, meticulously joined and placed and then hand rubbed creating a very distinctive and beautiful roof system.  Details like the handcrafted steel brackets (student made) and roof beam end caps (also student made) ensure a strong and long lasting structure that will serve the Wild Carnivore Facility for decades to come.   There are too many special features to list, like the student constructed functional windows.  The list goes on.

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The hand crafted main doors of Wolf Prowl

And there is no finer detail than the hand crafted door that leads into the large room of the facility.  Constructed from more of the recycled lumber of the roof structure, with very artful computer carved specially designed handles and using laser cutting in some of the recycled walnut used for the outside siding, the door is an elegant functional solution that adds beauty and identity to the Wolf Prowl.

New Faculty Member Joins Department of Clinical Sciences

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Tara Myers Harrison, DVM, MPH, Diplomate American College of Zoological Medicine

Dr. Tara Myers Harrison has joined the Zoological Health faculty at NCSU as the newest member of MSM (MultiSpecies Medicine) and EAMS (the Exotic Animal Medicine service) groups in the Department of Clinical Sciences at the College of Veterinary Medicine, NCSU.  Coming directly from an assistant professor position at the University of California at Davis, Dr. Harrison also brings her experience with northern species from over 10 years of teaching and clinical service at Michigan State University where she served on faculty in various roles and managed the health of the animals at the Potter Park Zoo.

 

 

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Dr. Tara Myers Harrison gives a wild black bear a quick physical examination

Dr. Harrison brings many talents to her new role at NCSU.  She earned her DVM from Michigan State University and holds a masters of preventive veterinary medicine earned at University of California, Davis where she worked onthe problem of infection of spotted hyenas with canine and feline viruses, working in the Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya.   She is dual boarded, having earned diplomate status in the American College of Zoological Medicine and in the American College of Veterinary Preventative Medicine.

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Dr. Harrison. the Veterinary Advisor for the Tenrec SSP, holds 4 small tenrec pups.

Dr. Harrison’s species range is broad.  Her publications range across the carnivora, but include papers on rhinoceros, gorilla and even tenrecs.   She serves as the veterinary advisor for the Tenrec SSP.   From rattlesankes to ostriches, she is happy to work on any species.  She has a very special interest in the application of oncological therapeutics and diagnostics in zoological species and hopes to pursue studies to improve the application of advanced techniques to those cases.

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Dr. Harrison examines the eyes of a falcon chick

Dr. Harrison’s 3 lively daughters and two able hounds  along with husband Scott accompanied her on a family expedition across the Southern route of the US this July to arrive in Raleigh, stopping briefly to take in the grandeur of the Grand Canyon.

tara and family grand canyon

Construction Pushes Forward for Design Build Project

Things are really starting to take shape over at the Wild Carnivore Facility. The team of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Veterinary students continues their push  towards a July 31st finish, with dramatic changes taking place every day.

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Students put their backs into ensuring a side post is plumb

The walls are up, giving everyone a sense of accomplishment and making it easier to visualize the what the functional husbandry building will look like and how it will benefit the Wild Carnivore Facility.  Attention to detail in the framing process is paying off in speed of progress working with very square lines.

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Roof beams are in place

Most of the walls are in place and the Architecture students working on the custom windows in the College of Design student shop are carefully crafting very special windows. Today’s schedule calls for the start of roofing and more advances in the landscaping arena as the dairy cows in J pasture look on in amusement.

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Design Build rocks!

 

The Landscape Architecture students’ talents shone particularly bright this week with the development of some lovely swales for erosion control, topped with river rocks. Other collections of stones and boulders are cropping up around the work site as benches, which will provide much-needed rest spots for the Design Build team and Carnivore team alike.

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Teamwork continues to be key in moving the build smoothly forward!

Framing Starts on Wild Carnivore Design Build Project

With just over 3 weeks to go, Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Veterinary students working on the Wild Carnivore Facility Design Build Project have entered the exciting phase of framing the structure of the new husbandry facility.  Weeks of design work have been followed by careful preparation of the site, including the installation of new gates created by the craftsmen of University Facilities to make sure the perimeter remains secure, and a new road designed and created by the students in the class.

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A Landscape Architect Student works on the road detail in front of the new access gates.

Then it was time to pour the footings.  One thing learned, if you are in dire need of rain, just dig some footings.  The rain will come.  Mucking the footer holes was an excellent bonding event for the students in the class.

Foundation ready to pourFooters and pilings carefully dug and positioned and ready for cement.

The logistics of working with limited access to the site called for unusual measures.  Rather than the more common approach of bringing a cement mixer to the site, students mixed and poured 217 eighty pound bags of concrete to create their foundation.  Everyone was in on the lifting, mixing and settling the concrete.   The whole pour was completed and every thing cleaned up in a half a day, a major feat.

concrete pour  3 at mixer concrete pour filling tube smTeam work conquers the foundation.

site panorama july 1Ready for the next step.

Lots of learning is going on as students of each profession help educate the others on the best way to approach the many different skill sets needed to create the project.  Some students have worked diligently in the shops at the College of Design, custom cutting and welding the steel post fittings, designing and building the windows that will be used in the project and even carefully re-planing and cutting recycled materials to keep the project on budget and on time.  Others have bent their backs on the site clearing, grading, moving materials and now framing the structure.

Learning to sawAn experienced advanced architecture graduate student instructs a willing, if modestly nervous veterinary student in the fine art of cutting posts with a super-sized circular saw.

3 professions work the dirtAn architecture student (left) and veterinary student (right) learn the fine points of getting grades and contours just right for proper drainage from the lead landscape architecture student on the project.

framing startsAnd finally the framing gets under way.  The building begins to get just a bit of form as the team accelerates towards the finish.

 

Niemuth Wins Evolutionary Medicine Fellowship

Dr. Jennifer Niemuth’s work on sea turtle cold stun syndrome just got a major boost with the announcement of her receipt of an Evolutionary Medicine Fellowship awarded jointly by the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center and the Triangle Center for Evolutionary Medicine.

niemuth head shotJennifer Niemuth,DVM

Evolutionary medicine encompasses any study that examines medical and health-related themes in the context of evolutionary science. The integrative nature of this emerging field looks at questions across disciplines such as epidemiology, psychology, cancer research, global health, veterinary science, and microbiology.  NESCent, sponsored by the National Sciences Foundation, has transitioned to the Triangle Center for Evolutionary Medicine, TriCEM.  The Triangle Center for Evolutionary Medicine (TriCEM) is a nonprofit institute exploring the intersection of evolutionary science and medicine. The center is jointly operated by Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, and North Carolina Central University.  TriCEM is an incubator that promotes innovative developments the theory and practice of evolutionary medicine by fostering cross-disciplinary collaborations among Triangle-based scholars, physicians, public health workers, and others.

Cc from NCARIA rehabilitated Sea Turtle awaits release off shore by Coast Guard Personnel

Dr. Niemuth’s awared supports her important and outstanding evolutionary medicine exploration about the evolutionary aspects of sea turtle cold stun syndrome.  With the support she will spend this fall semester integrating methods, concepts, and data related to the pathogenesis of cold stun and its broader translational implications.

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EMC Faculty Key Note African Conference

August 21-23, 2015, Drs. Michael Stoskopf and Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf will be in Durban, South Africa as featured invited speakers at the 4th African Conference on Zoo and Aquatic Medicine.  The conference, hosted by u-Shaka Sea World, brings together Zoo and Aquarium health professionals from across Africa to share the latest advances in the discipline.

african conf fill in thumbFor those who might be interested in attending this conference, contact Lindsay Boyter (lboyter@seaworld.org.za )

Click Here for Registration information

For information on accomodations go to the zoosafrica website by clicking here.

Big Rock Sampling Successful

Once again the EMC was helping to bring science to the famous Big Rock Marlin Tournament in Morehead City.  Two teams of investigators assembled at the docks each day to collect valuable information and samples from the marlin, tuna and mahi caught by the tournament fisherment.   One group led by Dr. Jeff Buckle and Paul Ruderhausen is looking at the stomach contents of the fishes to better understand their natural history and improve our ability to predict stock size and demographics.   Another group led by Dr. Michael Stoskopf is collecting blood, muscle, and eye fluids to study the metabolism of these pelagic predatory fishes to better understand their ability to adapt to environmental pressures.

busy big rock sampling table cropKyle Farmer (green glasses), and Dr. Sarah Cannizzo (scrub top) two UNC Wilmington Fisheries Biology students collect samples from the animals caught in the Big Rock Tournament.

The Big Rock Tournament is a major event in Morehead City each year.   2015 marked the 56th annual tournament, which boasted a total purse of $1,632,650 competed for by 149 boats fishing for Marlin, tuna, mahi and other large pelagic predatory fish. The Big Rock tournament has provided more than $1 million to tournament winners for 15 straight years, but it’s beginings were much more humble.

big rock crowds smThe crowd eagerly awaits the next weigh in on Wednesday afternoon of the 2015 Big Rock Tournament.

The first tournament in 1957 was the dream of Bob and Mary Simpson, Bill Strickland, Tom Potter and Dick Parker – charter members of the Fabulous Fishermen Club.  They convinced local business leaders to put up a cash prize of a couple hundred dollars which did the trick. Boats ventured further offshore blue marlin sightings began to come in, but in the summer of ’57, no blue marlins were caught.  It wasn’t until September that Jimmy Croy, fishing aboard the Mary Z with Capt. K.W. “Bill” Olsen, landed a 143-pound blue marlin. The returning boat was greeted by a large gathering and blaring police sirens and an impromptu parade along the waterfront followed, which included a child’s red wagon filled with silver dollars, the prize for the tournament.

Exactly where Olsen and Croy made their historic catch remains unknown, but most think they reached the Gulf Stream where it crosses a structure on the continental shelf called “Big Rock” from which the tournament takes its name.  The Big Rock is not a rock, but rather a series of ledges, peaks and plateaus about 8-10 miles long and 1 mile wide where many small reef fish are found, just a short distance from the Morehead City waterfront.

Next year’s Big Rock Tournament will be held June 10-18, 2016 and NCSU’s EMC and CMAST faculty and students will be there to learn more from the amazing fish caught.

ZTAU Design Build is Underway

The next big step in the evolution of the Zoological Teaching Animal Unity (ZTAU) is underway.  Students in the DVM program are teaming with graduate and undergraduate Architecture and Landscape Architecture students from the College of Design in a Design Build Project to improve the infrastructure of the ZTAU Wild Carnivore Facility.  Design Build is a very special form of studio class taught in the College of Design where students go from concept to well thought out plans and then actually construct the project over a 10 week summer session.   Part of what is special about this year’s Design Build course is that for the first time, Architecture and Landscape Architecture students are working together in the studio along with DVM program students.

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Veterinary students both serve as the clients for the design students, learning the best ways to communicate the program needs of the project to designers.  Then they will be learning how to manage biosecurity and animal and personnel safety while managing a construction effort near wild animals.

The project is led by Randy Lanou, a professor in practice for the College of Design along with his team of experienced professionals from Build Sense, a well established Durham design build firm.  Fernando Magallanes is directing the landscape architecture students and Dr. Michael Stoskopf is the CVM faculty member on the project.   Three ZTAU Summer Scholars are serving as the all important student facilitators for the course.  Their fellowships are generously provided by donors to the EMC Endowment Income Fund, and allow them to focus completely on ZTAU development through the summer.  Joel Lubell is a senior Architecture graduate student with considerable experience in volunteer construction as a former manager for Habitat for Humanity.  Josh Leab is also an advanced graduate student in Landscape Architecture with experience in design build.  John Griffioen is a DVM student with considerable wild carnivore experience.  These three teaching assistants are keeping the course running smoothly and the amazing pace needed to transform the husbandry infrastructure of the Wild Carnivore Facility in 10 short weeks.

Puppy Glamour ShotBaby pictures from last year of three of the young red wolves that will benefit from the new Wild Carnivore Facility Upgrades.

DVM Stars Win Clinical Proficiency Awards

Every year at the annual awards banquet the zoological medicine faculty get the opportunity to recognize the top students in the various areas of zoological health.  These students have gone above and beyond and shown particularly strong abilities in our discipline.  Each receives a plaque, sponsored by the student club WAAZM, which is engraved with their animal totem and commemorates their particular achievement.  This year, Dr. Craig Harms, Professor of Aquatic Medicine and Director of EMC Marine Health Programs had the honor of making the presentations.

WAAZM AWARD winners 2015mdThis year’s winners from left to right, Michelle Schiza – Aquatic Medicine ;  Sara McLaughlin- Avian Medicine ;  Ashley Emanuel – Companion Zoological Medicine;  Maggie Jinx – Wildlife Research;  Danielle Verderame – Herpetological Mediicne;  Amanda Malueg – Wildlife Medicine;  Back row:  Dr. Craig Harms;  Joe Malatos – Zoological Pathology;  Dr. Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf and Dr. Michael Stoskopf.