Good Match for EMC Programs and Many Alums

The process of matching internships and residencies is stressful for all involved.  Programs hope to attract the best and brightest, and the best and brightest try to figure out the best program for them, and hope they match with it.  Despite the stress and challenges, it is an exciting time.  This year both the Zoological Medicine Residency (Aquatic) and the Exotic Animal Internship in EAMS matched with the highest ranked candidate, a true cause for celebration.

Joining the EAMS team as the new intern this coming July will be Dr. Macy Trosclair, a 2014 DVM graduate from Louisiana State University and currently a rotating small animal intern at Texas A&M University. Dr. Trosclair has a strong interest in zoological medicine, particularly avian species and large carnivores, and plans to pursue a residency in zoological medicine and board certification in ACZM.  Trosclair w owl cropped thumb

As a veterinary student, Dr. Trosclair was one of the two veterinary student caretakers for “Mike the Tiger” the LSU Tiger Athletic Foundation mascot.  She was also a Morris Animal Foundation Veterinary Scholar, conducting research on alternative methods of GI parasite control in exotic ruminant hoof stock at Disney’s Animal Kingdom.  She is excited about joining EAMS this July.

Dr. Macy Trosclair holds a watchful owl on fist.

Joining the Zoological Medicine Residency this July as the next aquatics emphasis resident, is a well known NCSU DVM alumna, Dr. Lori Westmoreland.  Dr. Westmoreland is currently completing the internship at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.  There she is gaining important experience across a wide range of species from marine mammals to invertebrates.  LW Dolphin cropped thumb

During her time as a DVM student, Dr. Westmoreland was, among other things, a president of both the Wild Carnivore Team and the Aquatics Team.  She was responsible for the major renovation of the large coral reef tank in the CVM lobby, and was one of the team of students in the very first CVM and College of Design combined studio that initiated the zoological teaching animal unit project.  A lady with many talents, Dr. Westmoreland’s  painting of Orca was selected to hang in the Wellness Center after winning in the University Art Purchase Competition.  She is shown above posing next to one of her charges at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.

Not only did programs fare well in the match, but so did EMC alumni and students.  In addition to Dr. Westmoreland’s match with NCSU, her classmate, Dr. Kate Archibald will be joining the Omaha Zoo team as an intern this coming year after completing a small animal rotating internship in California.  Dr. Lily Parkinson, an NCSU rotating intern from Colorado State University matched with the Zoological Medicine Residency at the University of Wisconsin where she will be mentored by Dr. Kurt Sladky, a former resident in the NCSU Zoological Residency.  Returns are still coming in, but graduating DVM Zoological Focus senior Michelle Schisa has matched with her first choice, a rotating internship at the University of Tennessee, another school with a strong Zoological Medicine Program.   NCSU students and alumni are encouraged to let Dr. Stoskopf know of their match results so we can brag on them.

Rare Whale Strands

A 598 kg adult female Gervais’ beaked whale was found dead, washed ashore on Atlantic Beach January 23, 2015.  Beaked whales are not frequently seen, and discovery of one of these deep water whales provides scientists with rare and valuable insights into their lives.   This whale was just over 5 meters long and the NC Stranding Network team has been carefully examining all aspects of the animal’s anatomy assessing the probable cause of stranding and death.  Though it is relatively easy to identify a beaked whale to genus (Mesoplodon), which has only 2 teeth, which are not fully erupted if at all,  identifying the species is much more challenging.   The expertise of stranding network experts along with the availability of portable x-ray equipment allowed the rapid identification of this whale as a Gervais’ beaked whale ( Mesoplodon europaeus).

Me-JMS-038 mandible VD cropped

Radiograph of the mandible of the rare Gervais’ beaked whale showing the characteristic two unerupted teeth or tusks.